Fair and Square J.C. Penney

The logo making the most news this week is J.C. Penney's reinvention of its red square, with some significant changes. The new design brings the logo closer to the American flag in color and layout, in which the square speaks loudly to represent the company's new pricing strategy, "Fair and Square." J.C. Penney worked with Mother and Peterson Milla Hooks on its relaunch, and revealed plans for an overhaul of store layout, along with a complete transformation of its pricing strategy.

bizjournals.com | brandingsource.blogspot.com

5 Comments
Bill Backus
Well its the beginning of May and JCP is still running strong ... fair and square ;)
May 4, 6:22 PM
Jeff Halmos
A couple things come to the peanut gallery in my mind: 1) It's much more contemporary. Almost Hilfiger-like; 2) The square is good and thick. Designers often get timid in this regard; 3) It's going to take billion$ to get people to accept in their minds an acronym instead of a full word. I'm not so sure the rebus effect will be an easy one for consumers; 4) The actual wordmark being 25% of the overall logo, could have a diminishing effect of the brand because it's INSIDE the symbol.
February 2, 5:31 PM
Keith F
Didn't work for Gap. Don't see it working for JCP. Hard to say without seeing any extensions. But if you read between the lines of what Ron Johnson, the new CEO, has to say about his vision of the brand this generic approach is in dancing around the target.
February 1, 7:06 PM
Rich T
Not a big fan of this. Much prefer the old one. Red and the blue...meh. I like the choice of typeface though.
January 31, 4:52 PM
Love the reinvented identity. The balance of color, form, and type work in harmoney to emote the essence of pure Americana. I recently saw the February issue of their catalog and appreciated how they utilized the new square shape - quickly adding equity to the new identity. So far they've done a great job and I for one hope to see big things over the next five years for jcp. Great work!
January 31, 11:24 AM

 

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